Quinoa Pizza Bites

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Just WAIT until you try these! If you’ve ever caught anyone saying they don’t like quinoa then this is the recipe to convince them they like it.   Your family is going to devour these quinoa bites, they really will!  And you yourself don’t have to feel guilty eating them…according to the original post (linked in the next paragraph) their calorie count is just 35 calories per bite!

I found them over at So Very Blessed and thank Becky over there for sharing them.  Becky says they’re “hands down” the best thing she’s ever cooked.

As far as making them with food storage ingredients, they cooperate just perfectly!  I used ground chia instead of eggs, freeze dried cheese and veggies in exchange for fresh.  I’ve tried out two different variations so far… both of which have been great!   They’re so easy to change up based on what you like or what you can eat (even vegetarian) I’m convinced anyone can work these yummy bites into their plan!

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Pantry-Made Falafels

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Although the name sounds exotic and quirky, falafels are simply fried balls or patties of mashed chickpeas/garbanzo beans. They are common in the Mediterranean and Middle East, either served as appetizers with hummus, tzatziki, and flatbread or stuffed into pita pockets with lettuce and tomato. Falafel patties also make excellent veggie-burgers!

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Homemade Hummus

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Hummus is a tasty and healthy Mediterranean spread made from chickpeas/garbanzo beans. While these commercial Hummus Snack Packs are convenient, hummus is quite easy to make at home (and LOTS cheaper!). Basic hummus is an excellent addition to your FoodStorageCookbook because it is simple to make, requires no fresh ingredients and leftovers can be frozen or canned.

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Chapati & Roti (Flatbread)

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Chapati and Roti are super-simple flatbreads perfect for the stovetop, grill or campfire. Chapati and Roti are very similar and often used interchangeably. Depending on who you ask, the major differences appear to be that Chapati are larger and thinner, and cooked on a dry griddle; whereas Roti are smaller and thicker, and are cooked on a lightly oiled griddle. Whatever you call them, they are delicious and a wonderful addition to your FoodStorageCookbook. This recipe makes 6-8 flatbreads, roughly 6″ in diameter.

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Ultimate Veggie Burgers

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My #1 son (the one allergic to peanuts, beans, etc.) is away at scout camp this week so it seemed a perfect time to try out a Cook’s Illustrated recipe for veggie burgers that I normally wouldn’t make for the family with him here.  They turned out great!

For those unfamiliar with Cook’s Illustrated magazine, it’s essentially a “test kitchen” publication with recipes being tested every which way in order to come up with what these “experts” consider the best all around recipe for whatever it is.   I love it!  So (from their July 2005’s issue) for them to name this recipe the “ultimate” veggie burger — caught my attention.  I love a good veggie burger and have been wanting to try out for myself what they’d come up with and so boldly named.

The staple ingredients creating the texture are brown lentils and bulgur wheat while for the “meaty” taste they used mushrooms and cashews.  The result:  the burgers’ texture is fantastic (not gummy like some I’ve tried), they form into a patties just beautifully and the flavor is great.  Overall, this veggie burger is really REALLY good, much better than what’s available store bought and not too much work to make.    Plus, it’s easy to “sub” in storable ingredients, as I’ve done here, making it a possibility for your food storage plan!  If you’re a veggie burger fan I can promise you’re going to love this recipe!

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Wheat Meat: Meatless Spaghetti and Meatballs

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We’re moving into radical food storage territory today!  As a disclaimer, I have to say, if it hadn’t been for my friend Sherida trying this herself first (and having her kids loving it) I probably wouldn’t have believed this would have worked.  So hopefully if this seems like a super crazy idea I can be the same type of guinea pig for you to find the courage to try it.  If you do, you’ll have an added option from your food storage that not only uses up the wheat you’re storing but also saves money at the grocery store and creates healthy “fake your family out” meatless meals.  Wheat meat looks and tastes like meat, it’s the same consistency of meat;  I think you’ll be as surprised as I was!

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Rice Salad with Oranges, Olives and Almonds

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This light rice salad is a great one for when the weather starts heating up.  I really like the flavors and textures this salad includes; it’s something different for a potluck that everyone will enjoy!

To get the rice to remain light and fluffy (instead of heavy and clumped)  for use in a salad like this you’ll want to try out this {unusual} technique for cooking rice.  It’s great for when you’re wanting rice to taste like it was “just cooked” even after being cooled for a while.  The trick here is to begin by toasting the rice and then boil it in a full pot of water (like you would with pasta), drain it and then spread it out on a baking sheet to cool and dry off.  It works!  No more clumpy rice 10 minutes after cooking time.

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Tex Mex Millet

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Millet is a great grain to store!  It can be popped, or as in this recipe, treated like rice and cooked. Gluten free and high in amino acids, it’s has the highest iron content of all grains besides amaranth and quinoa.  It’s very mild and easy to digest and recommended by doctors for people with ulcers or other digestive problems.  Good stuff for sure!

This recipe using millet is one that I’ve made and shared at food storage tasting tables before and has always gotten a lot of praise.  I originally found it posted online, adjusting it a little to be a food storage recipe, and discovered it was a keeper.  Later, I found out that the recipe I’d found had come from the cookbook “Veginomicon“, a popular vegan cookbook I’d recommend checking out. Read more