Archive | July, 2012

Chapati & Roti (Flatbread)

31 Jul Stack of prepared Roti

Print the recipe card!  chapati and roti (flatbread)

Chapati and Roti are super-simple flatbreads perfect for the stovetop, grill or campfire. Chapati and Roti are very similar and often used interchangeably. Depending on who you ask, the major differences appear to be that Chapati are larger and thinner, and cooked on a dry griddle; whereas Roti are smaller and thicker, and are cooked on a lightly oiled griddle. Whatever you call them, they are delicious and a wonderful addition to your FoodStorageCookbook. This recipe makes 6-8 flatbreads, roughly 6″ in diameter.

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Dry Veggie Powder Mixes

27 Jul Homemade Dry Veggie Powder Mix

Print the recipe card!  dry veggie powder mixes

Condiments and seasonings go a long way towards adding variety and interest to your food storage, but buying commercial jars and mix packets can get really expensive and nibble away at your real food budget. I stumbled on this homemade version when I was figuring out new things to do with our dehydrated vegetables.  The huge bonus is that you can make your own custom dry mixes while using up any dehydrated veggies that aren’t family favorites or that you’ve discovered don’t reconstitute well. Dry mixes like these have a multitude of uses, limited only by your imagination. So far I’ve used them for chowder and soup bases, pesto, casseroles, omelets, salad dressing and dips.

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Food Storage, Part 4: Storing Animal Proteins

24 Jul

Any of the food preservation methods discussed in Part 1, and the additional UHT (ultra-high temperature pasteurization) and curing (using nitrates and/or smoking) for the protein category, should adequately prevent your stored foods from spoiling if stored properly, so I’m more concerned with which storage methods produce the best results for the different ways I use animals proteins in my Food Storage Cookbook recipes. Ultimately, milk is milk, and meat is meat; but different storage forms of these products perform very differently depending on how you cook them and what other ingredients you’re using, and some forms are definitely better than others for certain applications. Although there are exceptions, this article discussions my general observations with the different forms of storage animal proteins.

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Food Storage, Part 3: Storing Grains and Vegetable Protein

20 Jul

Any of the food preservation methods discussed in Part 1, and the additional UHT (ultra-high temperature pasteurization) for the vegetable protein category, should adequately prevent your stored foods from spoiling if stored properly, so I’m more concerned with which storage methods produce the best results for the different ways I use grains and proteins in my Food Storage Cookbook recipes. Ultimately, oats are oats, and tofu is tofu; but different storage forms of these products perform very differently depending on how you cook them and what other ingredients you’re using, and some forms are definitely better than others for certain applications. Although there are exceptions, this article discussions my general observations with the different forms of storage grains and proteins.

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Food Storage, Part 2: Storing Produce

17 Jul

Any of the food preservation methods discussed in Part 1 should adequately prevent your stored foods from spoiling if stored properly, so I’m more concerned with which storage methods produce the best results for the different ways I use fruits and vegetables in my Food Storage Cookbook recipes. Ultimately, a tomato is a tomato, and a potato is a potato; but different storage forms of these products perform very differently depending on how you cook them and what other ingredients you’re using, and some forms are definitely better than others for certain applications. Although there are exceptions, this article discussions my general observations with the different forms of storage fruits and vegetables.

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Food Storage, Part 1: Common Methods of Food Preservation

13 Jul

There seems to be a limitless amount of long-term storage and short-term pantry foods on the market these days. For someone just starting out, the selection can sometimes be overwhelming. For someone with more experience who is used to their “tried and true” method, changing to a new product or method can be a bit daunting. In most cases, the nutritional content of foods is fairly equal between fresh, cellared, frozen, canned or dried so it really comes down to storage ability, flavor, texture, and ease of use for your recipe. Hopefully my experimentation and observations during these last three years living in the bush, without access to much fresh food, no refrigerator and a tiny freezer can help shed some light on the matter and give folks a more comfortable place to start. In this four-part article, I will discuss some common preservation methods, provide a performance chart of some common stored foods, and give a few tips for some of the more difficult or less common stored foods.

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Sweetness

12 Jul

Our sweet new arrival finally made her entrance over the weekend!  We’re loving every minute with her!!

Creamy Millet and Turkey Salad

4 Jul SaladCompleteAlt (1)

Print the recipe page!  creamy millet and turkey salad

Cooking from your pantry using food storage ingredients doesn’t mean you‘re limited to rice and beans. Most people are familiar with rice pilaf, but millet is a refreshing change of pace and is gluten-free, unlike couscous and bulgur. If you aren’t familiar with millet, you’ve probably seen it a million times without even realizing… it’s those tiny buff-colored beads in birdseed. Fear not, its people food, too! Today’s recipe is for a creamy millet “pilaf” and turkey salad, served warm or cool, that is sure to tempt your taste buds.

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